Physical Education Curriculum

The provision of sport at Brentwood School is dynamic, vibrant and flourishing, involving a significant number of dedicated professionals working with talented, highly motivated and committed pupils.

There are many different components, including Physical Education, Games, GCSE Physical Education, AS/A2 Physical Education, IB Sport Exercise and Health Science and Extra-Curricular Sport - all of which are an integral aspect of Brentwood School.

The Physical Education department is committed to providing opportunity for participation, enjoyment and performance in a range of physical activities with active, challenging and dynamic learning situations. Lessons are designed to cater for each individual pupil in respect of promoting the development of movement co-ordination and the acquisition of motor skills. In this modern era, it is essential that pupils understand the benefits of exercise and it is hoped that this will stimulate a lasting interest in sport and physical recreation. Pupils are encouraged to enhance their inter-personal skills in co-operative and competitive situations and appreciate the importance of personal qualities relating to sportsmanship and fair play. Pupils at Brentwood School will develop the advanced ability to evaluate their own and others performances and suggest strategies for refinement of techniques. The psychological benefits of sport are of vital importance and through consistent participation, pupils who are given the opportunities to succeed, irrespective of ability, develop self-esteem and self-confidence.

The curriculum is designed to be accessible and all students are entitled to have the opportunity to progress and reach appropriate levels of attainment in order to realise their potential. This involves teachers matching tasks to the needs, interests and abilities of the students in a learning situation which is challenging and stimulating. Ultimately, teaching and learning strategies are designed to stimulate, enthuse and enable students to gain personal satisfaction from their participation. Sport at Brentwood School has traditionally been very strong and it is important to continue to strive for excellence in all aspects.

A Level Physical Education

Content
H555:  Theoretical Content - 70% of total marks

  • Physiological factors affecting performance (30%)
  • Psychological factors affecting performance (20%)
  • Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport (20%)

H555: Practical Content – 30% of total marks

  • Performance in Physical Education

How the course is taught
The units are taught by three subject teachers; who each deliver the three separate elements of the theory course. A heavy emphasis is placed on student participation, presentation, research and independent learning. The School Library is well resourced for all courses. Further learning resources are available through the Physical Education Department Virtual Learning Environment. 

The practical units do not have contact lesson time devoted to their development. Students are expected to pursue their practical activities in their own time, making use of the co-curricular sporting support network of the school and local clubs. Pupils’ progress is continually monitored and students are heavily advised on how to prepare for assessment. The skill of evaluation and improving performance is developed and linked into the theory side of the course.

Expectations/Homework
Subject teachers set tasks according to an agreed work programme which helps students to manage their time. All students are expected to engage fully in lessons, keep up-to- date and to read and research widely in order to support their independent learning.

As previously mentioned, there is an expectation that students take responsibility for the development of their practical performance. Students must demonstrate effective time management to participate on at least a weekly basis in their chosen activity areas throughout the academic year.

Preparatory Work
All students complete summer work before entering the Lower Sixth and this provides them with an excellent introduction to the topics that we study.  

IB Sports, Exercise and Health Science (Standard Level)

Content
The core topics include:

  • Anatomy
  • Exercise Physiology
  • Energy Systems
  • Movement Analysis
  • Skill in Sport
  • Measurement and Evaluation of Human Performance.

Optional Topics
In addition to the core topics above, two ‘Option Topics’ must be studied, selected from:

  • Optimising Physiological Performance
  • Psychology of Sport
  • Physical Activity and Health
  • Nutrition for Sport, Exercise and Health.

How the course is taught
Each course is normally taught by two subject teachers.
A heavy emphasis is placed on student participation, presentation, research and independent learning. The School Library and Physical Education Department resource room is well resourced for the course. Further learning resources are available through the Physical Education Department Virtual Learning Environment.  Students are supervised through the process of completing their Internal Assessment.   

Expectations/Homework
Subject teachers set tasks according to an agreed work programme which helps students to manage their time. All students are expected to engage fully in lessons, keep up-to-date and to read and research widely in order to support their independent learning. IB students are expected to be resourceful and committed to intellectual enquiry. 

The Extended Essay
Pupils may wish to consider Sport, Health and Exercise Science as the focus for their Extended Essay, particularly if they intend to study Sport and Exercise Sciences or a closely related discipline at university.  Students are free to select any topic and it should be noted that the assessment criteria give credit for the nature of the investigation and for the extent that reasoned arguments are applied to an appropriate research question. Students would normally be expected to extend their knowledge beyond that encountered in the Diploma Programme course they are studying. The essay must be completed within 4000 words. Up to five hours of staff supervision are available to assist with the planning, research and execution of the Extended Essay.

NB; Extended essays are normally undertaken in HL subjects as students often do better owing to the level of study.

Preparatory Work
Students are provided with introductory material to study before embarking on the course. This is handed in at the very first lesson for assessment. Students are then tested on this material within the first week of term.

IB Dance (Higher Level)

Content
There are three Core aspects to the course.

  1. Composition and analysis
  2. World dance studies
  3. Performance

Clarity in relationship to space, time, dynamics and movement qualities appropriate to the work.

Communicative expression in relation to other performers and to the audience.

How the course is taught?

  • You will have one or two teachers for the two years of the course, studying Dance for 8 or 9 periods per fortnight
  • Emphasis is placed on student participation, presentations, research and reflection, whether completing written or more creative tasks
  • Teaching typically proceeds through examination and discussion of particular techniques and styles, connecting dance with its cultural context, and exploring them to gain a physical and theoretical understanding
  • The course deliberately attempts to develop students’ understanding of dance styles that are both familiar and unfamiliar.

Expectations/Homework
Subject teachers set tasks according to an agreed work programme which helps students to manage their time. All students are expected to engage fully in lessons, keep up to date and to complete written and creative tasks as set. IB students are expected to be resourceful and committed to intellectual enquiry and it is hoped that our Dance students will be wanting to investigate aspects of Dance beyond the bounds of the curriculum.

The Extended Essay
An Extended Essay in Dance provides students with an opportunity to focus on a topic in Dance of particular interest to them. In consultation with their supervisor, the student should carefully choose a topic of special interest, keeping in mind the availability of sources required to research it. The student is encouraged to develop a plan and structure for their research before its commencement, then to proceed in a disciplined and imaginative way to arrive at a logical, and preferably personal, conclusion.

Dance as expressive movement with intent, purpose and form that communicates through the body and gesture of the dancer should be at the heart of the Extended Essay.

A particular dance or a particular style of dance may be chosen as the core focus of the Extended Essay. Students should strive for a coherent verbal analysis and interpretation of one or more dances in relation to the chosen research question. Although the dance itself is of primary importance, consideration should be given to the role of the dance, dance styles or traditions within their cultural context, in terms of their historical and current practice, as well as their social, religious, political and/or intellectual significance.

The Essay must be completed within 4000 words. Up to five hours of staff supervision are available to assist with the planning, researching and providing feedback and advice.

Preparatory Work
Students should enter the subject with a wide range of experience of Dance, both performing and in watching professional performances. Summer work is set prior to the beginning of the course to introduce the World dance studies unit and to start to develop some of the skills of analysis which are a pre-requisite for successful composition of original work.